Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989)

Each man hides a secret pain.  It must be exposed and reckoned with.  It must be dragged from the darkness and forced into the light.

Finished reading: Claudius the God, by Robert Graves.

You know how it is when one talks of liberty.  Everything seems beautifully simple.  One expects every gate to open and every wall to fall flat.

This book (by which I mean both I, Claudius and Claudius the God, neither of which can actually function as standalone works) is really extraordinary!  Graves clearly know his shit backwards and forwards and from all other directions besides, but he doesn’t merely compile a dry inventory of names, dates, and facts.  Nor does he over-novelize historical events or even take liberal dramatic license in relaying them.  Rather, by giving Claudius his voice he provides an insightful and compelling interpretation of events, one with I believe great social relevance.  The book is more like historical commentary than historical fiction, and yet it is full of passion and drama nonetheless.  I can think of no other book which strikes such a perfect balance.  And the prose is just fantastic!  It’s jumped onto my list of favorites for sure.

The Republic was never restored.

Trans-Siberian railway, #4: Irkutsk & Yekaterinburg

Trans-Siberian railway, #3: Lake Baikal (at Listvyanka)

Trans-Siberian railway #2: Mongolia (Ulaanbaatar and Gorkhi-Terelj)

Beijing, night and day.

So, if anyone’s wondering where I am in the next few weeks, the answer will be somewhere along the trans-Siberian railroad.  The first stop was Beijing, and tomorrow I depart for Mongolia.

My last meal in Korea: the perfect bowl of mulnaengmyeon.
It’s been three years, and I’m rally gutted to be leaving this truly unique country.

My last meal in Korea: the perfect bowl of mulnaengmyeon.

It’s been three years, and I’m rally gutted to be leaving this truly unique country.

I read the second volume of Tokyo Ghoul online courtesy of Twisted Hel Scans.

pecoraz:

inspired by this post

Torchwood, episode 1.11 “Combat”

You promised to keep a hold of your life.  Don’t let it drift.

Tags: torchwood

Joseon Gunman, episodes 13 & 14

Love and pride,.. such luxuries are too extravagant for the likes of us 

"

Most men - it is my experience - are neither virtuous nor scoundrels, good-hearted nor bad-hearted. They are a little of one thing and a little of the other and nothing for any length of time: ignoble mediocrities. But a few men remain always true to a single extreme character: these are the men who leave the strongest mark in history, and I should divide them into four classes.

First there are the scoundrels with stony hearts, of whom Macro, the Guards Commander under Tiberius and Caligula, was an outstanding example. Next come the virtuous men with equally stony hearts, of whom Cato the Censor, my bugbear, was an outstanding example. The third class are the virtuous men with golden hearts, such as old Athenodorus and my poor murdered brother Germanicus. And last and most rarely found are the scoundrels with golden hearts, and of these Herod Agrippa was the most perfect instance imaginable.

It is the scoundrels with the golden hearts, these anti-Catos, who make the most valuable friends in time of need. You expect nothing from them. They are entirely without principle, as they themselves acknowledge, and only consider their own advantage. But go to them when in desperate trouble and say, “For God’s sake do so-and-so for me,” and they will almost certainly do it - not as a friendly favour but, they will say, because it fits in with their own crooked plans: and you are forbidden to thank them.

These anti-Catos are gamblers and spendthrifts; but that is at least better than being misers. They also associate constantly with drunkards, assassins, crooked businessmen and procurers; yet you seldom see them greatly the worse for liquor themselves, and if they arrange an assassination you may be sure that the victim will not be greatly mourned, and they defraud the rich defrauders rather than the innocent and needy, and they consort with no woman against her will. Herod himself always insisted that he was congenitally a rogue. To which I would reply, “No, you are a fundamentally virtuous man wearing the mask of roguery.” This would make him angry.

"

— Claudius on his antihero friend Herod Agrippa in Robert Graves’ Claudius the God

bibliophilebunny:

How can this flesh be so soft and yielding, and yet your heart be like an iron fist?

bibliophilebunny:

How can this flesh be so soft and yielding, and yet your heart be like an iron fist?

Sailor Moon Crystal, episode 04 “Masquerade Ball”

Even if I am a princess, where’s the fun if I’m all alone?